Brighton Festival 2016Counting down to our 50th
Festival this May

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Festival Hot Seat... Antahkarna

Gauri Sharma Tripathi is the acclaimed Indian choreographer bringing Antahkarna and the free outdoor dance show Bodyline to Brighton Festival. In this Festival Hot Seat she tells us about the shows and the traditional Kathak form of dance.

Can you tell us what your show is about?

The tradition of storytelling is rediscovered through the Kathak vocabulary in Antahkarna. The piece probes the questioning voices of the past and present, vacillating between the sensuous, the spiritual, stillness and the nomadic.

The expression of love and devotion, from flesh and blood to the abstract presence of the almighty, is present in Vyom. In Timelapse we see a dialogue between the body and the soul, until all dissolves and what remains is dance. Throughout, contrasting attitudes of harmony and discordance are communicated through the various tones of Kathak.

The three episodes, Vyom, Vyuha and Timelapse, permeate into the realms of our innermost core by embarking on an adventurous inner journey — a journey that begins with innovation, expressions and improvisations.

‘Katha Kahe So Kathik Kahai’ He who tells a story is a Kathak.

Where did the idea and inspiration come from?

Kathak is the major classical dance form of northern India. It is derived from the dance dramas of ancient India — ‘Kathak’ means ‘to tell a story’. When patronage shifted from the temples to the royal courts, the emphasis shifted from the telling of religious stories to entertainment. Today, the story-telling aspect of Kathak is usually of secondary importance; the dance is primarily an abstract exploration of rhythm and movement.

Why do you think it’s an important story to tell?

In the words of Martha Graham, ‘dance is the hidden language of the soul’. For me, dance is where happiness comes from. All trials and tribulations are knotted together; thus we need the constant unearthing of ourselves to grow, finding a fleeting moment when we feel elated and alive.

What sort of person is going to love this show?

The versatility, heritage, and reachability of the Kathak form communicates to one and all. Let’s celebrate dance and the festivities together.

What does Brighton Festival mean to you? Do you have a favourite Festival moment?

The excitement of being part of history being made, with 50 years of the Brighton festival itself is a landmark moment. I am really happy to be participating with a traditional Kathak solo, and my favourite being Bodyline performed on the 25th as well. You see the myriad dimensions in which the Kathak dance vocabulary transforms the proscenium space to the outdoor crossroads for Bodyline.

Find out more about Bodyline and Antahkarna

Festival Hot Seat… Breaking the Rules

Carlo Gesualdo, Prince of Venosa and Count of Conza, composed some of the most intense and glorious music of the Renaissance. He was also a brutal killer, and the full horror of his crimes stands in stark contrast to his astonishing music. We talk to Clare Norburn, the author of The Marian Consort’s Breaking the Rules to find out more about this unique show…

How and where will it be staged?

In All Saint’s Church, Hove (very fitting as the play is set part in Gesualdo’s chapel and partly in his head!) – it is half a concert/half a one man play – and our wonderful director Nicholas Renton (best known for his TV work on Musketeers, Lewis and George Gently) has staged it so that the music and text are really blurred and we try to bring the action around the audience. We want the audience to feel that Gesualdo is really speaking to them personally.

Why should someone come and see your show?

Well, our pilot performance and preview have had a really amazing audience reaction. People are fascinated by the story and seem to leave wanting to know more about the man and his music – which makes me feel we’re on to something special. Also, it’s rather unusual being half a play and half a concert – no one has toured a show quite like it before.

Why do you think it’s an important story to tell?

I think Gesualdo’s life and music has been misunderstood. He’s underrated as a composer and not often performed because the music out of context is seen as “difficult” – but it really isn’t once you adjust your ears. It’s extraordinarily powerful and exciting. I see Gesualdo as a kind of Gustav Mahler figure of the late 16th century – once people were given a way into Mahler’s music, he quickly became a “cult classical music figure”. I think the same could become true of Gesualdo.

What sort of person is going to love this show?

If you like slightly dark stories and something a bit different then this is the show for you!

What’s going to surprise people about this show?

Hopefully the music. The story. And the way that we have tried to create a completely different kind of show – half a concert/ half a play.

What does Brighton Festival mean to you?

Do you have a favourite Festival moment? I grew up in Brighton and as a teenager I sang in the Brighton Festival Chorus so I got to perform in many Festival concerts in the mid 80s. As a teenager, I didn’t really have a lot of access to arts events in London and so the Brighton Festival was for me the time when the city (which felt quite ordinary in the mid 80s – not as arty as it is now) became a truly magical place where anything could happen and where I felt part of a cultural community. I loved hanging out after performances at the Festival Club and seeing who might turn up!

This year marks 50 years of Brighton Festival. What does it mean for you to be part of the festival in this milestone year?

I came to the Festival launch in February and, although I was already thrilled that we had been asked to take part, hearing about all the other starry events made me feel particularly excited and honoured to be involved this year. Brighton Festival has been a huge part of my life – as a teenager performing with local choirs, as a singer performing as a young artists in the classical lunchtime series and now with my play here too.

What are you most looking forward to in Brighton Festival this year?

I am keen to see La Nuova Musica’s Dido and Aeneas (they are a particularly exciting up and coming young group and I just saw them in London) and I’m really interested to see Stella by Neil Bartlett at the Theatre Royal. As a teenager I was fascinated by local history and so the story of a local cross-dressing Victorian actor brought to life on a Brighton stage sounds fascinating.

Book now for Breaking the Rules

Festival Hot Seat ... Zvizdal

We catch up with Yves Degryse, Artistic Director of Berlin, who are bringing their ‘filmic portrait’ Zvizdal (Chernobyl – so far so close) to Brighton Festival


Can you tell us what your show is about?

Over four years we have been filming near Chernobyl in the forbidden zone. Each time we went it was to meet two people, Petro and Nadia, a couple in their 80s, living in Zvizdal and who refused to be evacuated following the nuclear disaster. They have been living with no water or electricity and no means of communication with the outside world. Every time we went we took a plane and hoped they were still there. We spent time filming them in their everyday lives.

How and where will it be staged?

The audience will be seated in two tiers in front of a big screen, and underneath the screen will be three scale models of the couple’s house and grounds, depicting three seasons. There will be two cameras filming the models and these images will be interspersed in the film.

Where did the idea and inspiration come from?

The French journalist Cathy Blisson, formerly a critic, but who moved into reportage, came into contact with Petro and Nadia and asked if we would be interested to collaborate with her, and we quickly decided to start the project.

Why do you think it’s an important story to tell?

The moment you enter the forbidden zone, you are entering a microcosm of human experience. It is a very extreme situation, but there are layers that you recognise, and as you spend time there the layers become more visible.

What sort of person is going to love this show?

Our work can be complex but at the same time it appeals to a very broad audience.

What’s going to surprise people about this show?

There will be surprises, relating to the concept of the piece, but the surprises you should not know beforehand.

What does Brighton Festival mean to you?

We have brought work to Brighton Festival before including Perhaps All The Dragons in 2014, and Lands End in 2012. What I really like about Brighton Festival is that I have the impression that the audiences are very eager to discover things. I think it’s connected with the way the Festival approaches the audience, not underestimating the audience.

This year marks 50 years of Brighton Festival. What does it mean for you to be part of the festival in this milestone year?

I’m very happy that we will be part of that moment.

Book now for Zvizdal.


Festival Hot Seat... Song Conversation

Our Guest Director Laurie Anderson is bringing Song Conversation to Brighton Festival, a free-wheeling collaboration with musician-composers Nik Bärtsch and Eivind Aarset. In this Festival Hot Seat Nik and Eivind tell us about the show and how they came to work with Laurie Anderson

This is your second song conversation together – How did the original collaboration come about?

Nik: I had the chance to invite two musicians for the program "Song Conversation" initiated by Thomas Wördehoff for the Ludwigsburger Schlossfestspiele in Germany. Eivind immediately came to my mind since he is a great collaborator and we’d already played a few times together. Usually there should also be a singer on board for this program but I had a challenge to think of a person that would be inspiring to collaborate. I talked with Mr. Wördehoff and he suggested Laurie. I was immediately enthused since I loved records like “Bright Red” and “The Ugly One with the Jewels”. I listened to these records a lot when I was in my twenties. The idea of “Song Conversations” was also to include songs that were inspiring during an artist’s life.

All together we had lots of fun and also found answers to many artistic questions that were raised when we talked about “a song”. So the initial idea of covering influential songs developed into a general musical conversation about the song itself and its contexts. Of course Laurie is brilliant in this and her stories worked on several meta levels which was totally in the sense of us all.

Why ‘Song Conversation’? What exactly does the show involve?

Nik: The notion of a “song conversation” embraces the idea that songs can talk to us and they can talk to each other. Also there can be a dialogue about the song itself or we can enter the song like a house.

Eivind: We treated the subject of a “song conversation” in a kind of loose way. Not so much playing concrete songs, but more looking at the subject, and exploring different themes thru association.

Nik: We had so many ideas about the possibilities of this “conversation” that the performance jumped constantly from one meta level to the next. We played self-invented songs, songs about songs, stories about songs and we interpreted songs composed by us and other artists like Alban Bergs and Lou Reed.

How much of the show is improvised? What do you enjoy about that approach?

Nik: We improvise a lot, to serve the song and its context. We will also improvise with the moods around Laurie’s stories, some flow directions are agreed but then the moment decides how the piece develops. I like the approach to have a flexibility while respecting the songs’ integrity.

What is it like to work with Laurie Anderson?

Nik: Very inspiring of course. I like the story telling singing and her approach to always think about the meta level of content and context. We also seem to share an interest in ironic or droll moments in music and performances, whilst also an appreciation of the serious spiritual deepness in them.

Eivind: I have been a fan for many years, so it was a fantastic for me to be invited to work with Laurie. I was even more impressed after working with her. Just hearing the sound of her voice, experiencing the timing she has when telling a story, and having my sound being a part of this, was a very inspiring experience. She also has a very clear, playful, creative and focused mind, with this beautiful ability to come up with conceptual ideas that go beyond music, crossing borders of art forms in a very organic way, and all the time, it seems to me, with the aim to get a deeper message or meaning across.

Will the show cross all genres of music?

Eivind: I think the show reflects our different personal sounds, and therefore is totally undogmatic when it comes to genre. Even though I often play at jazz festivals I don´t really consider myself to be a jazz player, my background is more rock and ambient music. And Nik has a very personal touch and with aesthetics that go beyond genres. Laurie is a genre of her own.

What sort of person is going to love this show?

Eivind: I think people who are interested in all kinds of music and poetry will enjoy it.

Nik: The good thing with music is, that you never know an answer to this question...

Have you visited Brighton before? What were/are your impressions of the city?

Nik: When I was a teenage student, long ago in a kind of bizarre phase of my life, I visited Brighton whilst staying in Hastings. I am happy now to have a second chance to enjoy this famous place for such an inspiring festival with such fantastic artists!

Eivind: I have been to Brighton a couple of times before, and enjoyed it a lot, but previously my visits have been too short. Luckily this time I will have the chance to stay for longer, so I am very much looking forward to it.

Book now for Song Conversation

Combined ticket deal with Laurie Anderson's Slideshow available in person or on the phone

Festival Hot Seat: Bec Britain - Fanfare

We caught up with Brighton-based artist Bec Britain to find out more about her 1960’s inspired installation Fanfare at the Clock Tower featuring giant trumpets and chequerboard flags in graphic black and white adorning this iconic Brighton landmark throughout May

How did the piece come about?

Brighton Festival approached Samesky with the idea of creating a piece at the clock tower as it is such as iconic location. It’s so central and a real crossing point for people - and it has a very strong visual impact. Samesky then contacted me as I had created a flag installation for the Rugby World Cup in the autumn so they knew that I could handle it!

When you work on the clock tower it’s quite epic – it’s on such a large scale that you have to do lots of working out in advance and there’s no way of testing out if it’s going to fit . You just have to work it out from the measurement and hope for the best! After the Rugby World Cup I really wanted to do something even more ambitious and this seemed like the perfect opportunity.

Do you always work on a large scale?

I actually do a combination of large-scale sculpture and book binding – so literally both ends of the spectrum from the really small to the incredibly large.

You are based in Brighton – what does Brighton Festival mean to you?

I have lived in Brighton for 20 years. In fact my first job in Brighton was as Project Manager for Streets of Brighton so the Festival always been very close to my heart. For me, this piece was an opportunity to celebrate the breadth of Brighton Festival and call out to the next generation of artists which was very important.

Do you have a favourite Brighton Festival moment?

Too many to mention. Walk the Plank at Queens Park and the Group F at Preston Park were fantastic. I also loved Hofesh Schechter’s Political Mother – he’s an absolutely incredible artist.

Can you tell me about the design of the piece itself?

With this year marking 50 years of Brighton Festival I wanted to look back to 1967 where it all began. And I wanted to explore the Festival theme of Home so I looked at this year’s Brighton Festival logo which reminded me of brutalist architecture! I echoed the black and white of the logo in the design and if you look closely you will find cut up pieces of Festival ‘F’s all over the piece in a subtle nod to home.

The main focus though was very much about creating a rallying call to the next generation of artists After all - without artists it won’t be able to continue for another 50 years. I also wanted it to be big and bold and in your face – like the Festival itself – a fanfare calling in all directions to the artists of the future.

Fanfare is on from Sat 7 - Sun 29 May 

Festival Hot Seat... Masquerade

yello brick are bringing Masquerade to Brighton Festival, so we asked them to tell us all about it. 

Can you tell us what your show is about?

yello brick invite you to enter the Masquerade Ball, a world of anonymity and duplicity that spins a web of lies and truth around it’s guests. Carry out tasks, hide your secrets, do whatever it takes to win. You will need to form bonds, break relationships and be ruthless in your pursuit of glory but remember….trust no one. Masquerade is a street game set in the physical world during which participants receive instructions from the mysterious hosts of the ball. It invites participants to test their wit and cunning, where lies are truths intertwine.

How and where will it be staged?

Masquerade will take place outside on George Street (we have our fingers crossed for sunny weather).

Why should someone come and see your show?

If people are looking to see something a bit different and interactive then this is the show for them. It’s a mix between theatre, game and story and is one that encourages interaction between participants. Hopefully it will be quite a spectacle so even if you aren’t taking part it will be visually exciting to watch.

Where did the idea and inspiration come from?

We’ve always wanted to make something interactive that could be both social and playful. We wanted to see if it was possible to make an audience come together and play and how they respond within a game. How can we get a group of people who have never met before to interact in a fun and immersive way that is perfect for festival crowds.

Why do you think it’s an important story to tell?

For us the heart of the game is about what people do when they are given anonymity. How does this affect how we act within a crowd. Will crowds respond to stimulus and action and what will this whole experience be like to view from within and from outside it.

What sort of person is going to love this show?

People who love to play and those who love to play but don’t realise it yet.

What’s going to surprise people about this show?

If we tell you, it will spoil the surprise.

Have you visited Brighton before?

We haven’t been to Brighton before so this will be a really exciting adventure for us. Brighton seems to be such a vibrantly creative place and we are looking forward to exploring!

This year marks 50 years of Brighton Festival. What does it mean for you to be part of the festival in this milestone year?

This is the first year that we have created work for a festival and we are really pleased to be part of Brighton Festival especially for such a milestone year. It’s fantastic to be part of something that has established itself as one of the best festivals in the UK.

What are you most looking forward to at Brighton Festival this year?

Meeting new people and seeing some amazing shows.

Festival Hot Seat... Portraits in Motion

Volker Gerling spent over a decade touring Germany by foot, capturing the people that he met in his distinctive flipbook portraits. We caught up with him to find out about the development of his craft and his extraordinary show Portraits in Motion

Can you tell us what your show is about?

In the summer of 2002 I took an old wooden kitchen tray and made it into a simple hawker’s tray. It had room for six photographic flipbooks, which showed portraits of my friends, and I hung a sign on it saying “Please visit my traveling exhibition”.

I walked through Berlin, showing people my flipbook ‘movies’. I screwed an empty honey jar underneath the hawker’s tray so that visitors could pay a symbolic entrance fee.

For nearly a year I showed people my flipbook movies in Berlin. Then, I decided to become a journeyman – I wanted to find out how people all over the country would react to my flipbooks.

And I wanted to make some new flipbooks.

I was afraid that I would miss something if I travelled too quickly, so I decided to walk. In the summer of 2003 I walked from Berlin to Basel – a walk of 1,200 kilometres – and it was a great experience. So I decided to do it again.

Since then I have walked nearly every summer and in total I have walked some 3,500 kilometres, nearly all in Germany. On all of these walks my only source of money came from showing my flipbooks. Portraits in Motion is based on my long summer walks and the people I met on them.

Volker with his tray of flipbooks

How and where will it be staged?

I leaf through the flipbooks under a video camera that projects them onto a large screen, and I tell the stories about the people that are portrayed. The show is a reflection on the passing of time and what it means when people meet each other.

Why should someone come and see your show?

To see my protagonists come to life on screen in a way that you’ve probably never experienced before.

Where did the idea and inspiration come from?

My inspiration comes from my fascination for human beings, faces, portrait photography, walking and storytelling.

Why do you think it’s an important story to tell?

Because every story that is told from the heart is important.

What sort of person is going to love this show?

Everybody who is able to see great things emerge from small things.

What’s going to surprise people about this show?

Nothing will prepare you for the intimacy of the flip books. There's something magical about these miniature glimpses into human souls.

This year marks 50 years of Brighton Festival. What does it mean for you to be part of the festival in this milestone year?

It feels like a big honour for me to be part of the festival this year.

Book now for Portraits in Motion

Festival Hot Seat... Chiflón: The Silence of the Coal

Chilean company Silencio Blanco tells us more about the UK Premiere of their show Chiflón: The Silence of the Coal at Brighton Festival. 

Can you tell us what your show is about?

Chiflón, The Silence of the Coal is the story of the mines, from the perspective of the people who worked them. A young miner is expelled from the coal pit where he works, and to keep working he has to accept a job in ‘El Chiflón del Diablo’, an infamously sinister mine. Silencio Blanco portrays the miners’ world through everyday situations and anonymous characters - also focusing on the role of women in these mining communities. 

How and where will it be staged?

Chiflón is going to be presented at the Brighton Dome Studio Theatre, and it’s a simple collaboration between the puppets and their manipulators, who give life to the marionettes in a manner almost like a little dance between them. This is supplemented with simple scenery made with recycled materials like old wood, to show the simplicity of the work and the lifelike detail of every movement.

Why should someone come and see your show?

This play is unmissable, primarily for the visual language that’s used: marionettes constructed of newspaper and chopsticks, which, together with other day-to-day elements that have been recycled and re-purposed, give life to these bodies and to a fascinating and moving story.

Furthermore, despite us coming from far-away Chile - at the edge of Latin America - this language allows us to tell a completely universal story, focusing on the depths of these people, touching the very fibres of their being through everyday situations, just using movement and gesture.

Where did the idea and inspiration come from?

This play emerged from our intention to portray a particular job, a lost job, anonymous and lonely. That’s why we chose miners, inspired by Baldomero Lillo’s tale, Chiflón Del Diablo. Lillo is a brilliant Chilean author, naturalist, and witness of the world that he observes. He is considered to be the Chilean Emile Zola.

To develop the idea and the inspiration, we traveled to the town of Lota, in southern Chile, where we met mining families and ex-miners that today have no jobs. They told us their stories and experiences, their sadness, pains and dreams, and we realised that the miners’ history is a living treasure that we want to tell with our work.

Why do you think it’s an important story to tell?

Mainly because it’s a universal story.

It’s inspired by a town in Chile, but it cuts across all of humanity, because it talks about the human emotions of the workers faced with these conditions, and the role of the women and their uncertainty of not knowing if their men will come back from the mine or not.

Also because it talks about history - from the little stories of anonymous characters and the daily situations they face. It tells history from the perspective of the defeated, not the winners.

What sort of person is going to love this show?

Anyone aged 6 to 99.

What’s going to surprise people about this show?

The magic of the marionettes – how delicate and natural they are.

The illusion that can be produced through the marionettes is able to stir even the deepest emotion in the heart.

Have you visited Brighton before? What were/are your impressions of the city?

No we haven’t visited Brighton before, but we’re really excited to get to know the city and enjoy the festival. We don’t have any expectations – we just want have fun and enjoy it – but we hope people there will love and enjoy our work, which was prepared with a lot of love, care, attention to detail and, of course, hard work.

This year marks 50 years of Brighton Festival. What does it mean for you to be part of the festival in this milestone year?

We’re excited to be part of this huge festival and celebrate together the 50th anniversary. To us, it’s very important be part of this, because this is the first time that a Chilean company has participated in Brighton Festival, so it’s an honour to represent our country there – particularly with a very Chilean story, the story of the miners. It’s a privilege to present this work, and we are sure that everyone is going to enjoy it. We are bringing you a little piece of our history. 

Book now for Chiflón: The Silence of the Coal

Festival Hot Seat... Slap and Tickle

We catch up with Liz Aggiss, the 'unclassifiable' performance artist behind Slap and Tickle 

Can you tell us what your show is about?

As the title suggests it’s a show of opposites; slap and tickle, punishment reward, push and pull……..all the way home. It’s about inconsistencies, propaganda, interpretations, mythologies, platitudes and expectations on, and of, girls, ladies, women, mummies, mothers, grannies, pensioners and senior citizens. It’s about using performance as a means to create a discussion, a dialogue about the observed and received cultural mores, forays and sexual taboos.

How and where will it be staged?

Slap and Tickle is presented in three fast moving acts, using a visual and aural collage of movement, text, props, costumes (Holly Murray), sound (Joe Murray) and cover versions (Alan Boorman/Wevie). The performances take place in the intimate black box Studio Theatre space on Thursday 19th May at 8 pm, and Friday 20th May at 7pm and 9.30 pm.

Why should someone come and see your show?

Because for the past 40 years I have been re(de)fining my own brand of British contemporary dance performance, dodging categorization and being classified as unclassifiable. Because there are limited opportunities to see live work. Because if you don’t come to see the work in Brighton the next chance will be London, then, Tasmania, India, Norwich, Bournemouth, Scotland and I can’t guarantee it will return to Brighton in the near future. No contest! Because I invite the audience to ‘…..have a party’ and then confound their expectations of what this party might be. Because I make, funny, accessible, empowering and thoughtful work. Because what are you waiting for? Permission? Because it’s granted!

Where did the idea and inspiration come from?

I was born on Nanny Goats Common, Dagenham, Essex, a post war baby, into a repressive era in the suburbs, where parents were truly in charge and children were seen and not heard. I never had a clue who I was, or what I wanted to do, I just knew I wanted to be seen and heard. I come from a pre televisual age, a world of radio drama, Mrs. Mills, post music hall variety acts, cor blimey and oooer missus, that opened the dark tabernacle into the soul of early feminism. It is this personal history when placed alongside feminist politics that compels me to create a context in which to scratch that particular itch. Slap and Tickle is that itch.

What sort of person is going to love this show?

Bring an open mind and no preconceptions as to what you think a mature, ageing, post menopausal, solo, female, dancing body should be doing, why she should be doing it, and where it should be done, and you should be just fine. There are no limits except for those under 15 on account of the strong language. Not my call!

What’s going to surprise people about this show?

The pace, the speed, the unpredictability, the roller coaster ride.

What are you most looking forward to in this year’s Brighton Festival programme?

Flexing my performance muscle and presenting Slap and Tickle in three consecutive performances. Apart from that taking a punt on unknown and new discoveries in unexplored locations, whilst soaking up Brighton and the festival atmosphere.

This year marks 50 years of Brighton Festival. What does it mean for you to be part of the festival in this milestone year?

I’ve lived in Brighton since 1975. I’m still here, still making, still performing, still touring, nationally and internationally, still in the picture……… though not so still, I can’t stop moving! Must be the sea air.

Book now for Slap and Tickle

Festival Hot Seat... Clairière Urbaine

We caught up with Retouramont to find out more about their UK premiere Clairière Urbaine

Why should someone come and see your show?

The show - and more broadly the artistic work of the company Retouramont - offers new perspectives on the city. It doesn’t consider walls as limits but rather as openings and opportunities - and a means to invent new choreography. In our shows we aim to shift perspectives and invite the audience to discover their neighbourhood in a very new way.

How and where will it be staged?

It will be staged in Lavender Street. Some anchoring will be made on two buildings so the dance can evolve on the wall of one of them and in-between, in the air and over the audience.

Where did the idea and inspiration come from?

It came from the desire to go beyond, but not in the usual sense. As a climber, cliffs or boulders are limits you want to go over. I like when this movement can also be inventive and aesthetic. In the city, I find this desire for crossing and going over particularly joyful and creative.

What sort of person is going to love this show?

Everyone can enjoy this aerial and acrobatic dance show that grabs the city in all its dimensions. We do not try to impose any story on the audience - each person can create their own story. This is our way of inviting the audience to feel and accept a shift of perceptions and take a new look at their surroundings.

What’s going to surprise people about this show?

We propose a different and new use of the city that no one has seen before, not even the architects or inhabitants of the neighbourhood. They may look up for the first time and see buildings differently from now on.

Have you visited Brighton before? What were/are your impressions of the city?

This is my first time in Brighton - I'm curious to discover it.

This year marks 50 years of Brighton Festival. What does it mean for you to be part of the festival in this milestone year?

It’s great to see such longevity in a festival of art, vertical dance is about 25 years old. In this sense, I find it very interesting to question and analyse our practices in the long-term: how did street arts emerge? What is their social role? etc.

Head this way for more info on free event Clairière Urbaine.