Brighton Festival 2017Public booking opens: Fri 24 Feb, 9am

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In photos: Week 3

Brighton Festival 2017 is over! We can't believe what a fantastic month it has been – here's a few photos from events in the last week

Photos by Vic Frankowski and Adam Weatherley

New app The Hum invites festival-goers to view Brighton in a new light

The Hum, a free app which highlights the beauty in the everyday, is now available to download.

A Brighton Festival co-commission conceived and directed by Nic Sandiland, The Hum is a reflection and meditation on our own everyday interactions with the city. Half cinema, half reality, the piece weaves together visuals with a specially composed soundtrack.

Festival-goers will be invited to follow a trail on their smartphone screen, guided by the app to 15 locations within walking distance, around the city, and on arrival a narrated soundtrack will be played.

The Hum incorporates text from four diverse artists including: international dance artist Wendy Houston, dance writer for The Times Donald Hutera, Maria Oshodi director of Extant Theatre Company of visually impaired people and live artist Pete Phillips, to a sound score by musician James Keane. These writers explore the subtle qualities of observed and experienced movement to create their own idiosyncratic narratives ranging from the poetic and humorous through to the ironic and subversive.

Director Nic Sandiland says ‘The Hum gives audiences a new perspective on the everyday happenings in Brighton. Set to an emotive musical score with thought provoking text the piece takes you on a journey through 15 often-overlooked places in the city, places that we take for granted. The Hum makes us look at the mundane acts which take place in these places and by elevating them to the status of a feature film. At times profound yet often personal it is an immersive work that reveals an alternative view of the city through the movements that take place within it.’

Click here to download The Hum on Apple and Android devices

Volunteer call-out: Depart

Take part in Circa's sold-out performance Depart at Brighton Festival –call-out on behalf of LIFT Festival

Depart is an exciting new international collaboration featuring circus artists, aerialists, acrobats, dancers, choral singers and musicians working in tandem with video, lighting and installation artists under the direction of celebrated Australian director Yaron Lifschitz and his company Circa.

Depart will be shown in Brighton as part of the Brighton Festival with 8 performances from Tue 23 to Sun 28 May at 8.30pm and 10.15pm. Show duration is 60 to 65 minutes.

Audience Guides

To compliment the artistic model and the outdoors promenade format of the show, Depart is looking to recruit 12 to 18 volunteers locally in Brighton to match the role of Audience Guides.

Audience Guides are an integral and central part of the show implementing the task of leading audience through the site following a pre-agreed route and ensuring audience’s observance, including walking in silence, not treading off the given route and not taking pictures during the show.

Mapped along the route will be performance areas featuring circus artists, aerialists, acrobats, dancers, choral singers enhanced by the elements of lighting design, sound and video work.

The production can offer an expenses cover of £100 to all volunteers for your time on the project.

Depart will offer scheduled training sessions led by Circa Associate Artistic Director Alice Lee Holland. Previous performance or audience stewarding experience is desirable, but not compulsory. Audience Guides will need to show confidence when interacting with audience and be able to follow artistic direction. All training sessions will take place at Extra-Mural Cemetery next to Extra-Mural Chapel, entrance to cemetery from Lewes Road.

Training sessions:

Sat 20 May: 4pm – 8pm

Sun 21 May: 4pm – 8pm

Full attendance is expected, if possible.

Further to that, Audience Guides will be expected to have evening 6.30pm – 11pm availability on Tue 23 – Sun 28 May. They will need to attend a technical rehearsal on the evening of Tue 23 May, a dress rehearsal on Wed 24 May, and be available on show days Thu 25 – Sun 28 May.

Costume

As part of the costume brief, Guides will be expected to come dressed in black trousers, comfortable black shoes or boots.

If they own a white shirt, they will be expected to wear that also. Alternatively the production will provide a shirt. The production will also provide each guide with a black coat. We advise that everyone dresses warm and wears layers, as those will be long hours in the outdoors.

Upon appointment, please provide production team with your coat size.

For further information, please contact Linda: linda.peterkopa@gmail.com

In Pictures: Chidren's Parade 2017

Poetry In Motion!
A few photos from an incredible Children's Parade. What an amazing and wonderful way to mark the start of Brighton Festival 2017.

The theme for the 2017 Children’s Parade, the largest of its kind in Europe, which is jointly produced with award-winning community arts organisation Same Sky and supported by local business Yeomans Toyota Brighton, was Poetry in Motion, and around 5,000 children from 67 schools and community groups from across the region took part.

Leading the parade was Guest Director Kate Tempest and special guests Hot 8 Brass Band, who brought a brilliant slice of New Orleans funk to the occasion. 

Participants took inspiration from poems and poets including Edward Lear, Spike Milligan, Rudyard Kipling, Christina Rossetti, Lewis Carroll and William Shakespeare, resulting in a glorious array of outfits and mannequins from an Owl and a Pussycat in a pea green boat to a giant jam sandwich!

A heartfelt thank you to everyone involved. Thank you all for your magnificent creations and for your enthusiasm and to Same Sky Brighton and our sponsors for making this an epic Children's Parade to remember.

Find out more about our sponsor Yeomans Toyota Brighton


Festival Hot Seat… Five Short Blasts: Shoreham

Following the success of Gauge (Brighton Festival 2015) we are delighted to have Australian duo Madeleine Flynn and Tim Humphrey back this year. Here the artists tell us more about the UK Premiere of their hotly anticipated show Five Short Blasts: Shoreham at Brighton Festival 2017.

Can you describe the show you are bringing to Brighton Festival?

The show that we are bringing here is called Five Short Blasts: Shoreham and it’s a journey in a boat, where you listen to the sound of the place and the sound of the people in the place. You listen to where you are but also you listen to voices and sounds that we have orchestrated and created for you as we traverse a journey.

How and where will the work be staged?

Audiences will arrive at a Jetty, they will be welcomed aboard the boat and then they will take off and travel the river – the river Adur in Shoreham Port – out into the sea and back again. Over that experience of time they will encounter things that are both designed and of the site. The river Adur has an incredible intersection of people who are using this space both recreationally and commercially and that gives rise to a whole lot of interesting ways of looking at and working with the water. It’s been really fun talking to the people of Shoreham about their relationship with the water. Being from somewhere else, we couldn’t do a project like this without a really great local support and a local liaison.

Why should someone come and see your show?

There is something special when you go in a boat and when you listen in a boat, it is a very different kind of thing than just going to a concert for example, obviously. There is something meditative which takes you to a different state of mind. When you hear people’s stories and you are actually sitting on the water listening to it you get a more deeply sensed appreciation of where this place is and what it means. We hope as people experience Five Short Blasts: Shoreham they will be able to see and hear something that they did not know was there before.

Where did the idea and inspiration come from?

The work initially came out of an invitation, but also out of a respect for those people who have a connection to the water and opened that world to us. We started doing some research for the beginnings of this idea of a work on the water and the first person that we talked to had been a harbour master and he talked us through the signalling systems. Of course, as audio artists, if anybody is talking us through a system that is all about sound and its meanings - it’s so appealing! So, immediately we wanted to use that language of the sea. Five Short Blasts in marine signalling language means I am unsure of your intentions and I am afraid that we are going to collide. That’s a metaphor for what the show’s about – which is about the differing uses, the sometimes conflicted and conflicting uses and experiences on the sea.

What’s going to surprise people about this show?

In this work the tides are crucial. We can only access the river around high tide - two hours either side of high tide – so, that’s a beautiful ticking process over that whole month for us. The times of the performances that are possible change, so the varieties of lights and waves and the manor of things that are happening on the water will change over that whole season.

What does Brighton Festival mean to you?

It’s a great honour to come back. We really loved Brighton audiences, we had a fantastic time when we did Gauge for a month. The variety of people that come, the variety of different ways that people respond, the sorts of conversations that are possible – that is a really nice thing to be around as an artist. I am looking forward to seeing what happens this time, who we meet this time and how those people respond to what our offer is.

Five Short Blasts: Shoreham is at Shoreham Harbour Sat 6 – Sun 28 May

Festival Hot Seat… Storytelling Army

Stef O’Driscoll, the Artistic Director of nabokov Theatre Company talks to us about working with Kate Tempest, making the arts social and the formation of the Storytelling Army

How and where will the work be staged?

The Storytelling Army are a collective of diverse voices, of people from all walks of life that will pop up all over Brighton during the Festival – be it in the local supermarket, the pub or on the top deck of a bus - and tell their stories which celebrate the theme of Everyday Epic. Everyday Epic looks at us as human beings, at what we do on a daily basis and celebrates those little achievements - whether it is that today I am sober, or I have managed to take my kids to school and I suffer from depression, or whether it’s my first day of paid work - whatever that everyday epic is, it’s the chance to celebrate that and tell that story.

Where did the idea and inspiration come from?

The idea really came from looking at Kate Tempest’s philosophy of making the arts less exclusive and more social. Kate is an absolute mastermind and I’ve been very fortunate to work with her over the years in terms of directing some of her plays. A couple of years ago, we started to think about other ways that we could work with each other and we could engage new audiences in theatre and storytelling. We started talking about what happens if you have someone just walk in to a pub and start telling a story, but you don’t realise they’re actually telling a story. How would that even function? How would that even work? Could you do that? Could you just be sat at the bar with someone and then they start delivering a poem or telling a story? So, that was the birth of the idea and then when Kate became a Guest Director of the Festival we started to rethink about that idea and whether this would be the right platform to do that. Hence the army of storytellers was born!

How did you begin to research and develop the project?

We started to have a conversation about the different groups that we’d like to work to champion people’s stories. In Brighton, there’s lots of issues in terms of drug use and addition, there’s lots of homelessness and vulnerably-housed people and so we started to identify different organizations and charities that we’d want to work with in partnership to create that army of storytellers.

Why do you think it’s important that these voices are heard?

I think it’s really important that we champion diverse voices in regards to storytelling so that people have stories that they can relate to. Within our theatrical landscape there’s a lot of communities and a lot of voices that are not championed and are not heard. There’s a really important exchange that happens when you see a story where you understand that world, or you identify with that character - you as an audience member are able to understand what your role is within the world. For example, Kate Tempest’s novel, The Bricks that Built the Houses talks about a South London that I know, that I’m a part of. It deals with subcultures that were very much a part of my experience of growing up. There’s a beauty and magic that happens from reading a book that exists for me championing my world, that speaks in a language that I understand. So, we have to champion diverse voices from all walks of life to be able to give that experience to wider communities, for people to actually engage in the arts – people that wouldn’t normally. Otherwise it’s going to remain an elitist thing, which can’t happen.

What sort of person is going to love this show?

The main hope is to engage new audiences in to accessing the arts by breaking down those barriers. So, for someone who wouldn’t normally expect to experience the arts, to just stumble across it. They could be doing their shopping and they come away with a story, with identifying with something or just in part be entertained. It becomes a joyful experience that you haven’t had to pay for.

What’s going to surprise people about this show?

The beauty of this project is that it is pop up – almost like flash mob-esque. So, as an audience member you could be on your morning commute on your way to work, and you’re on the top deck of a bus and you experience an epic, beautiful poem, or this story that you weren’t really expecting. So, what will they expect? I think the unexpected. 

Festival Hot Seat… For the Birds

We caught up with Jony Easterby, lead artist and Producer of For the Birds on the immersive night-time adventure he is exclusively bringing to Brighton Festival 2017

How and where will the work be staged?

For the Birds is an immersive walk through a secret woodland location in Brighton. Within that landscape we are going to be placing various different sound and light installations which you will be able to discover. All the installations share a common theme which is based around our observations and love for birds and all things avian. So, flight, bird-song, movement and other narratives based around extinction and migrations, but also a celebration of their life and beauty.

Why should someone come and see your show?

One of the unique things about the show is that we have a lot of separate pieces, which are actually quite small, intimate works but added together they actually create a large landscape composition. As you move around the site sometimes you find yourself by yourself and then you might turn around the corner and then be with a crowd experiencing something quite magical. You will hear sounds come from near, from far, you’ll be able to get up very close to the work as well. We hope everyone is going to enjoy it as much as we do.

Where did the idea and inspiration come from?

The idea for the work actually came from quite a dark place in a way. I had been working as part of a research project up at the Centre for Alternative Technology to try and address ideas on environmental change, climate change, degradation of landscapes and extinction stories and I realised that if I concentrated too much on the negative aspects of things then I was startling myself in to non-activity. So, the bird narrative arose out of a way of actually both celebrating nature but also identifying that birds are really an indicator of the health of our own humanity and our planet and the way that we treat it. They literally are the canary in our coal mines.

What do you hope the audience will take away from the piece?

I’m hoping it will allow people to take away a sense of wonder and joy that we felt as we’ve been creating the work. I also want people to feel that sense of togetherness and conviviality - the way that people are drawn together to come and experience something communally, which is a really rare and beautiful thing to find in this day and age.

Finally, what does it mean to you to be a part of Brighton Festival?

Well to be a part of Brighton Festival for me is a real privilege. I’ve got almost a 30-year history of working in Brighton - the very first piece of theatre that I created was in 1987 after the great storm with a Brighton based company called Red Earth in Stanmer woods. So, to come back to Brighton for Brighton Festival is a fantastic sort of creative homecoming for me.

Book now for an immersive night time adventure where sound and light take flight with For the Birds, at Brighton Festival Sat 6 - Sun 28 May (except Mon & Tue)

Spotlight: For the Birds

Discover more about For the Birds a Brighton Festival Exclusive event.

Artist and producer Jony Easterby has brought together some of the most dynamic sound and lighting artists in the UK to create this unforgettable outdoor experience. Against a canvas of darkness and the sound of wind in the trees, audiences follow a 2km trail of ingenious and beautiful installations of light, sound and moving sculpture which will surprise and enthral.

Video produced by echovideo.co.uk

Spotlight: Depart

Depart is an ethereal collaboration bringing together acrobats, aerialists, choral singers and video artists for a breathtaking circus experience.

Inspired by the legend of Orpheus and Eurydice, Depart will take you on a haunting journey through the underworld in the uniquely atmospheric location of Woodvale Cemetery. Led by Circa’s Yaron Lifschitz with a creative team including electronic musician Lapalux.

Depart is at Woodvale Cemetery Thu 25 – Sun 28 May, 8.30pm & 10.15pm.

Video produced by echovideo.co.uk

Spotlight: Storytelling Army

We shine a spotlight on the Storytelling Army, a world premiere for Brighton Festival

Brighton Festival is working with Nabokov and Guest Director Kate Tempest to assemble and mobilise a Storytelling Army: a dynamic collective of people from all walks of life and all corners of the city, including those who are homeless and vulnerably housed. Look out for pop-up performances across Brighton, be it in the local supermarket, the pub or on the top deck of a bus.

The Storytelling Army will be popping up around Brighton throughout the Festival.

Video produced by echovideo.co.uk